Sep 13 2012

Talking photographs: the definition of sponsorship

“Sponsorship is not all about the material things. It is about the willingness of a person to help another [and] a connection between two people who have good relationships to one another.”
Andrew — A youth in the Philippines who is waiting for a sponsor

sponsor a child
Now that we have your attention …

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Aug 27 2012

Bob’s notes from Honduras: ‘Welcome to my world’

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“Bob’s notes” are reports from CFCA President Bob Hentzen, who regularly accompanies mission awareness trip participants. You can see Bob’s full update on his Facebook page.

It’s a joy to send you this message of solidarity and love from our CFCA sponsored friends and their families in Honduras.

Since its humble beginning in 1982, CFCA-Honduras has grown to include 16,088 children and 1,698 aging friends; all in four projects and 60 subprojects.†Currently, 1,955 individuals are on our waiting list in Honduras. Read more

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Aug 22 2012

Mothers in Mexico create positive change

Violence is a challenge that many families in Mexico face. In several communities the drug and gang violence has increased dramatically, which has driven some sponsored friends and their families from their homes.

The project staffs have to think of creative ways to help sponsored friends and their families while protecting themselves at the same time.

The Hope for a Family program conducts activities in safe locations that raise awareness among families about positive values and conflict resolution.

Many of the families are led by single mothers, and CFCA small community groups provide mothers with livelihood training workshops, encouragement and support.

We asked two of these mothers, Gloria and Maty, how the Hope for a Family program has helped them with the challenges they face.

Gloria

Gloria, CFCA staff member

Gloria is a CFCA staff member in Guadalupe, Mexico. She is the regional contact person.

Gloria’s 16-year-old son, Juan, was sponsored for 10 years. She was once the leader of her mothers committee and is now in charge of serving eight smaller CFCA communities in the Guadalupe project.

Describe some of the biggest challenges that you have faced as a mother and as a woman.

As a mother, my challenge is raising my child. He is becoming a teenager and his behavior has changed.

I [hope] he will keep practicing values that I, as his mother, tried to instill in him to be a better person.

As a woman, I wish to overcome [obstacles] in life with the opportunities that CFCA offers me. I am very thankful.

How and why did you decide to be a leader in your mothers committee?

I was elected by many mothers and I wanted to participate; of course, I never imagined being in the place that I am now.

What did you learn from this experience and how has it helped you personally?

I learned to listen to people and to help others in need. My participation gave me a lot of satisfaction.
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Aug 6 2012

Experiencing the grace, elegance of Nicaragua and its people

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“Bob’s notes” are reports from CFCA President Bob Hentzen, who regularly accompanies mission awareness trip participants. You can see Bob’s full update on his Facebook page.

It’s a joy to share with you the beautiful people of Nicaragua.

With a population of more than 5 million, statisticians rate Nicaragua as the largest in geographical size and economically poorest of Central America.

It is popularly known as the land of volcanoes, poets, artists and good baseball, but let’s add beautiful harmonies and colorful dances to that list.

CFCA serves 9,626 children and their families in Nicaragua, along with 856 aging friends. Currently, 1,280 families are on our waiting list for sponsorship. Read more

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Jul 31 2012

‘We translate more than letters, we translate hope’

Karla Manzur and CFCA sponsored child, Jaime, in El Salvador.

CFCA translator, Karla Manzur, helps CFCA sponsored child Jaime write a letter to his sponsor.

Karla Manzur has worked as a translator at the communications center in El Salvador for the past four years.

CFCA-El Salvador holds letter-writing day workshops where translators help CFCA social workers supervise the writing, spelling and legibility in letters written by sponsored children, youth and aging friends.

Karla attended her first letter-writing day workshop in February 2012.

“It changed my way of thinking,” Karla said. “When you start working as a translator you don’t understand how important a letter is to the sponsors and sponsored relationship. This visit made me realize that we cannot request a child to write a perfect letter.”

Translators attend letter-writing day to learn more about the communities where we work and the difficulties the sponsored individuals face when writing letters to their sponsors.

Ana, CFCA sponsored child, in El Salvador.

Ana, a CFCA sponsored child, writes a letter to her sponsor, John.

It also allows Karla to discover more about the Salvadoran culture and the lifestyles of people in the United States.

Karla feels like a family member when she translates letters.

Translators have an important role in the communication between sponsors and sponsored friends by strengthening the bonds of friendship between the two.

Being a translator gives Karla the experience of traveling across the world as she translates letters from sponsors.

For Karla, her work is rewarding.

She isn’t just translating any document. It is about translating the sponsored members’ dreams, wishes and their joy of being sponsored.

Related links

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Jul 22 2012

Parish group from Colorado finds loving reception in Guatemala

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“Bob’s notes” are reports from CFCA President Bob Hentzen, who regularly accompanies mission awareness trip participants. You can see Bob’s full update on his Facebook page.

I find the group from Risen Christ Parish as hopeful and dynamic as its name. Here in Guatemala, we are deeply grateful for their love of our people, their presence among us, their example.

Seems like their long-term pastoral plan flows into a very natural outreach toward their neighbors at home in Colorado and in Guatemala.

These friends encountered a richly green and fertile country, but a country heavily burdened by social problems.

Entrusted with the good will and the economic help of their fellow parish members, they worked hard (sometimes under good rains) to offer three sponsored friends and their families a more dignified home. Read more

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Jul 21 2012

Secure your future and help CFCA

Looking for a way to make a significant gift to CFCA while maintaining a source of lifetime income? Consider establishing a charitable gift annuity through CFCA.

Robinah and her grandmother

Robinah, a CFCA sponsored child in Uganda, stands next to her grandmother.

A charitable gift annuity is a simple contract between you and CFCA. In exchange for donated assets, such as cash or marketable securities, you receive a tax deduction and annual income payments for your lifetime and/or that of a spouse or designated beneficiary.

A portion of each income payment made to you by CFCA is considered a partial return of your gift and is non-taxable.

What other sponsors say:

“After retiring in December 2010, we arranged a charitable gift annuity with CFCA, which allowed us to see the fruits of our donation during our lifetimes and provide an insured stream of income as well as a tax deduction.”
ó John and Christine, charitable gift annuity donors

How charitable gift annuities work:

  • Jim and Judy, ages 77 and 75, transfer $20,000 to CFCA to fund a charitable gift annuity contract.
  • Jim and Judy receive a charitable deduction of $7,256 applicable to the tax year they make their gift.
  • CFCA pays Jim and Judy $1,020 annually for as long as either of them are living. Of their annual payments, $812 is tax-free and $208 is ordinary income for their life expectancy.
  • When Jim and Judy both die, 100 percent of the unused portion of their gift is designated for use by CFCA.

Charitable gift annuities provide significant lifetime income and tax savings. However, once the gift has been received by CFCA, it is irrevocable and cannot be returned.

It is recommended that the decision to fund a charitable gift annuity contract be discussed in advance with a financial adviser or attorney.

To explore charitable gift annuity options available to you, visit our website, email giftplanning@cfcausa.org or contact Michael Calabria at (800) 875-6564.

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