Tag Archives: flores

Mar 3 2011

Nurturing potential for 25 years in El Salvador

In December 2010, CFCA celebrated its 25th anniversary of service in El Salvador. Henry Flores, director of the communications center in El Salvador and an employee of CFCA there for 16 years, offers this reflection.

I was first introduced to CFCA in 1995 when I was returning from the U.S. where I had lived and studied for seven years.

The CFCA office in Santa Ana, in El Salvador, needed to hire a translator. Though I wasn’t the best translator, I was blessed to be given the opportunity.

Henry Flores

Henry Flores

My first thought about the job was, “This should be a nice way to readjust myself to the country and make some income until I find something better to do.”

The days passed and little by little, I reconnected with my roots and started to learn from the people of my country, those who are hidden in their cardboard, rusted metal sheet and old wood houses, those we call “the poor.”

They taught me that “rich” is not about how much you have, but how little you need. This made a permanent impact on my heart and what started as a temporary job has become a 16-year passion for service.

People living in poverty constantly humble me with their reality and difficult life burdens but unbelievable resilience and faith.

In December 2010, we celebrated the 25th anniversary of CFCA’s service in El Salvador. Twenty-five is an easy number to say but the stories and miracles behind it are endless.

I have witnessed the life transformation of thousands of sponsored members and their families, becoming better trained to build their own path out of poverty with the tools provided by CFCA.

Many of the children sponsored by CFCA in these 25 years are now adults, who have been able to break the circle of poverty, live with stronger family values and understand the importance of education.

Read more

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Jan 27 2011

Bolivian festival of miniatures a big deal

Walk2gether arrived in La Paz, Bolivia, in time to celebrate Las Alasitas, a local festival with indigenous roots.

Bolivian miniatures
Bolivian miniatures in hand

Here are two Bolivian miniatures, gifts to some of our staff in International. They are about an inch tall and easily fit into the palm of your hand.

Henry Flores, director of CFCAís communication center in El Salvador, spoke by phone with Ruth Valderrama, La Paz project coordinator.

Ruth and the walkers were arriving at the hotel and she did not have much time, but she managed to provide this brief explanation of the tradition.

The Las Alasitas fair is a local tradition that usually starts on Jan. 24 and lasts for about three days. People from all over La Paz and nearby El Alto come to the fair.

The fair is celebrated only in La Paz at the fair center and on the main avenue of El Alto, very close, but higher in altitude, than La Paz.

During the fair, local artisans, mostly indigenous people, make miniatures symbolizing different material wishes people have for the upcoming year.

These wishes can be for a house, a car, etc. People buy a miniature of the item they wish to receive.

There are also miniatures for those looking for a match. Women who want to find the man of their dreams buy miniature roosters. Men looking for a woman buy miniature chickens.

This major cultural celebration has its origins in indigenous Andean traditions. In ancient times, people would present miniatures to Ekeko, a household god of abundance and prosperity.

Many families in the CFCA sponsorship program participate in this local cultural celebration.

To see pictures from the fair, see our Facebook photo album.

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Nov 30 2010

A family transformed through CFCA’s work in El Salvador

We have two new stories on our website, hopeforafamily.org. Even though they focus on two people – Santiago and his son, Cesar – they are all about one incredible family.

Santiago's family

Santiago and his family

Santiago, from El Salvador, credits CFCA sponsorship with giving his family a support network of local CFCA staff, sponsors for his children and other families in the CFCA program.

ìI think the best gift that I could have received from God is to have a group of people who support me,î he said.

His oldest son, Cesar, is planning to study accounting and English. He’s a CFCA scholar and has received educational assistance, clothing and school supplies.

ìWithout CFCA, my parents could not cover these needs and I would have to drop out of school and go out and work to help my parents bring up my siblings,î Cesar said. ìThis is a real impact on my family and on my life.î

In the future, Cesar hopes to start a family, own a home and buy a car.

Read Santiago’s story here.

Read Cesar’s story here.

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