Oct 28 2013

5 factors to consider when choosing your sponsored friend

In El Salvador, CFCA sponsor, Mike Madama, prepares to give his sponsored friend Karla a big hug.

In El Salvador, CFCA sponsor, Mike Madama, prepares to give his sponsored friend Karla a big hug.

Behind every sponsorship is a story — how you found your sponsored friend, why you sponsored and your ongoing relationship as you both learn more about each other’s lives and dreams.

Sometimes, though, people aren’t sure where to start. Should they sponsor a boy or girl? Child, youth or aging person?

And in which country?

Here are a few factors that can help when choosing your sponsored friend:

Read more

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
Oct 2 2013

Wisdom of the Ages: Mercedes, 75, from Bolivia

Mercedes, a sponsored aging friend, stands outside her home in La Paz, Bolivia.

Mercedes, a sponsored aging friend, stands outside her home in La Paz, Bolivia.

CFCA sponsored elderly share life experiences and offer wise advice.

Mercedes is a 75-year-old widow in La Paz, Bolivia. She has eight children, 23 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Read more

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
May 10 2011

Media spotlight shines on North Dakota couple sponsoring 102 people

KFYR-TV features couple sponsoring 102 peopleWe have an amazing story of two CFCA sponsors that we wanted to share with you!

Bill and Karen Schneider live in Bismarck, N.D., and sponsor 102 people in 12 countries†through CFCA. Yes, you read that right ñ 102!

Their dedication is so great that KFYR-TV, the NBC news affiliate in Bismarck, N.D., recently featured them in a special for Mother’s Day (read the story and watch the video).

Please note: It was reported that 94 cents of every dollar goes to the recipient. That is incorrect. Approximately 94 cents of every dollar we spend goes toward program support, which includes benefits and services for sponsored friends and their families. We assign the most resources possible for the direct benefit of our sponsored children and elderly. As a result, CFCA consistently receives high ratings from independent charity evaluators.

Many thanks to the Schneiders for their support, and we appreciate these media outlets for telling their story!

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
Oct 6 2010

El Salvadoran man, 103, explains how to live a long life

In honor of International Day of the Elderly, weíre featuring Federico Antonio, a sponsored 103-year-old in El Salvador. He lives in a Catholic home for the aged. His sponsorship benefits are given to the home, and the sisters provide him with food and other supplies. Read on to learn why heís lived so long!

Federico Antonio

Federico Antonio, a sponsored 103-year-old in El Salvador.

What is your name? Federico Antonio.

How was your childhood? My childhood was humble. I did not have much upbringing, no education. I didn’t study. I had lots of difficulties. I was poor, and that is what I most regret.

Were you raised by your mother and father? Only by my mother. My father died when I was an infant.

Were you the oldest? No. I was the youngest. I am 103. My mother died at 105.

What year were you born? 1907.

Did you marry? No, I did not marry at all.

Do you have children? No, I don’t have children.

Why didn’t you marry? I didn’t have the means. Before, you paid 30 colones (6 U.S. cents) to get married. Imagine. And after that, you still had to eat, get a house and all the other things. Others can suffer, but me, no. If I am poor, I will suffer alone. But I had a girlfriend who told me, “Let’s get married.” But I always told her, no. Her name was Emilia and she was very pretty. But I didn’t want to marry, even though I intended to earn something to take care of her, but I wasn’t able to. I planted corn fields, but I couldn’t earn anything because the soil wasn’t good for corn. So, I learned to make bread and intended to get married at age 28, but I couldn’t.

In your youth, what work did you do? I was a day laborer. I cleared fields with a machete. I cleared coffee fields with a machete. The military accepted me. I learned to cut poles.

Did you live alone or with your siblings and mother? We lived together, with my mother, until she died.

Did your siblings play with you? Yes, we played and they beat me up and wrestled with me. I had to climb a tree to get away from them.

Read more about Federico Antonio’s story

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email