Jan 28 2013

Hamburger bun recipe from Honduras, part 2

CFCA serves more than 18,000 sponsored children and elderly in Honduras. A CFCA mothers group there, the Faith and Hope mothers group, sells homemade hamburgers to those in their community.

Last week, we posted part 1 of this recipe: Hamburgers and sauce from Honduras.

Here is part 2, the Faith and Hope mothers group recipe for homemade hamburger buns!

Hamburgers from Honduras Ö mmm!

Hamburgers from Honduras Ö mmm!

Get the recipe!

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Jan 23 2013

Hamburgers and sauce recipe from Honduras, part 1

CFCA serves more than 18,000 sponsored children and elderly in Honduras.A CFCA mothers group there,the Faith and Hope mothers group,sells homemade hamburgers to those in their community. They made such amazing hamburgers that we had to get the recipe and share it with you, along with a special sauce they make to go with the burgers. Here is part one of the recipe!

Hamburgers and sauce from Honduras

Hamburgers and special sauce from Honduras … mmm!

The mothers make and sell these hamburgers, and their recipe makes 40 burgers! You may want to adjust the recipe based on how many hamburgers you plan to serve. Get the recipe!

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Aug 27 2012

Bob’s notes from Honduras: ‘Welcome to my world’

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“Bob’s notes” are reports from CFCA President Bob Hentzen, who regularly accompanies mission awareness trip participants. You can see Bob’s full update on his Facebook page.

It’s a joy to send you this message of solidarity and love from our CFCA sponsored friends and their families in Honduras.

Since its humble beginning in 1982, CFCA-Honduras has grown to include 16,088 children and 1,698 aging friends; all in four projects and 60 subprojects.†Currently, 1,955 individuals are on our waiting list in Honduras. Read more

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Jan 17 2012

Natural home remedies for winter, flu season: Honduras

Herbs used for home remedies in Honduras

Clockwise, from top left, are eucalyptus leaves, orange leaves, anise seeds and ginger root. Maria, grandmother of three CFCA sponsored children in Honduras, uses all these items for her natural home remedies.

In our ongoing series about natural home remedies used by sponsored friends and their families, we look to Honduras.

Maria is caretaker of three CFCA sponsored children in Honduras. She has a vast knowledge of herbal remedies intended to alleviate discomfort from common ailments such as coughs, colds, fever and nausea.

Her practice does not discourage her neighbors from visiting doctors or hospitals. However, because of her vast knowledge in herbal remedies, neighbors prefer going to her first for a quick diagnosis and affordable treatment.

(Read more about how she uses herbal remedies to help her community.)

Here are some herbal remedies Maria recommends during the winter and flu season. Read more

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Apr 22 2011

CFCA in Honduras improves environment with eco-stoves

To celebrate Earth Day, we wanted to share this report from Ricardo Garcia, project coordinator in Santa Rosa, Honduras. It’s about eco-stoves that help both the environment and the health of our sponsored friends.

In 2008, the Santa Rosa project in Honduras initiated a medical campaign to benefit all the sponsored members and their families.

During the campaign, we learned that many mothers suffered from pulmonary emphysema caused by excessive smoke from cooking food.

Later in 2009, we initiated a reforestation effort because large swaths of trees were being cut in the communities. But the problem wasn’t getting better.

One solution addressed both problems. We decided to build eco-stoves because they use less firewood and they don’t produce smoke in the home.

Getting the program off the ground was difficult because the families were accustomed to seeing lots of smoke in their homes. But they see how much better off they are financially because they don’t buy as much firewood.

Their homes are free from smoke, their food is cooked healthier, and the man does not have to spend so much time gathering firewood. This gives him more time to work.

The project also provides an opportunity for the families to interact because from the beginning, we trained them to build the stoves.

The fathers help other households with the construction and in the process of sharing their knowledge, they support other members of the community and live better together.

The plan is to have enough funds to support this initiative so that someday, all families in the CFCA communities of Santa Rosa who need an eco-stove can have one. This should greatly diminish the deforestation problem.

We also hope to incorporate the support of other organizations and institutions to help us supply so many families.

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Nov 1 2010

Roundtable sparks discussion among sponsors, sponsored members

By Manuel Pineda, project coordinator, Santa Barbara, Honduras

Jeanne Quackenbush

Jeanne Quackenbush, a sponsor on the CFCA mission awareness trip, hugs one of the sponsored youth at the roundtable discussion.

Forming community in a world where individualism dominates family, social and business relationships stands as one of the greatest challenges we face at CFCA.

Our goal of building communities of compassion is ongoing and systematic as we need to promote a culture of life and values for families, society and the world.

During the June 2010 mission awareness trip, the CFCA project in Santa Barbara organized a roundtable discussion as part of the process of understanding the broader CFCA world.

This developed out of the necessity to place sponsored members, mothers, project teams and sponsors face to face to share, ask questions and learn from different perspectives the rights and responsibilities that each has in this family.

Youth asked sponsors about issues that helped them get a better idea of sponsorsí expectations of their sponsored friends.

Why did they make a commitment to a person that they had never met? What news that you receive from your sponsored friends makes you most happy or sad?

Reyna, who will graduate with a degree in education this year, shared about a change in her worldview: ìMy sponsor has helped me a lot. He has accompanied me in my life and has filled the role of a father that I never had. This has made me understand that now I have to be committed to others.

Lidia, a former scholar and now a member of the Santa Barbara staff, shared: ìIn the most difficult times of my life, when I felt that even my goals had died, CFCA was at my side. … Now I am committed on this team to give my best and serve so that others can achieve their goals and succeed in life.

Sponsors reflect that this learning opportunity was both a favorite and humbling moment.

Rebecca shared that she was impressed with the confidence and leadership the youth demonstrated in organizing the event and was impacted by the articulate way they expressed their hopes and dreams in sophisticated goals.

Roundtable in Honduras

A roundtable discussion takes place between sponsors and sponsored members at a June 2010 CFCA mission awareness trip to Honduras.

Jeanne writes of her surprise to learn that the mothers we met in the roundtable discussion had the same concerns and worries that mothers in the United States have about raising teenagers in these times. They want what I and most of my friends want: to raise happy, well-adjusted, Christian adults.

Mothers, project team members, sponsors and sponsored participants left assured that in this journey, there is always someone by their side encouraging and supporting them.

They understand the generosity they have received in life should be shared with others in this world.

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